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12 Potentially Dangerous Apps for Kids

May 11, 2020

The average teen spends more than 9 hours a day in front of a screen (kids ages 8-12 spend six hours in front of a screen every day). It’s no wonder 54% of teens think they spend too much time on their cellphones. And what are they doing? Using their apps. Mobile apps account for nearly 90% of mobile use! The average smartphone user has between 60-90 apps on their phone, and while many are helpful, some can pose danger, especially to teens and kids. But which of these apps should keep parents awake at night? We think these 12 dangerous apps for kids are worth noting. We’ve chosen them due to their popularity and risk.

  1. HIP

HIP is short for Hide it Pro. This app looks like a music manager, but its actual purpose is to store secret photos, videos and text messages. Kids use it to hide inappropriate material from their parents along with …

  1. Calculator+

Another “hiding” app, this time using a simple calculator icon. By entering your own code, you can access hidden photos, contacts, browser history and passwords, all kept safely from a parent’s prying eyes.

  1. Snapchat

If you have a teen or tween in your house, you probably have at least heard of Snapchat, which has more than 180 million users. Snapchat allows its users to send a photo or video from their phone, which then disappears after a few views. This “disappearing” feature, however, encourages the sharing of inappropriate photos. Unfortunately, it is easy for the recipient to take a screen shot, keeping the image or text forever.

  1. Tinder

This popular app has more than 4 million users. On Tinder, you can post a selfie and people can “like” you. If you like him or her back, you can connect—the app even includes GPS tracking to help you find one another. Tinder describes itself as “the fun way to connect with new and interesting people around you,” but it’s mostly used as a dating tool or for one-night stands, even between teens and tweens. You only need to be 13-years old to use it, although there is no way to verify someone’s age. It attracts online predators which is why one blogger calls it: “The Worst App Ever for Teens and Tweens.”